Jan 262015
 

I had a great weekend at the Global Game Jam (hosted by Intel and Game CoLab) this past weekend in Tempe, Az. I collaborated with an amazing team to make the game AZTEC VECTOR in less than 48 hrs… and we WON 3 awards! A big shoutout to Ian, Noti, Kalarrs, Max, and Melissa for making such a cool game so fast. I contributed game design ideas, title screen design, and of course, the game soundtrack. The soundtrack will available for download and stream by the end of this week. The game should be downloadable soon along with some pics and stuff.

AZTEC VECTOR TITLE MOCKUP copy 2

Check out this preview clip below…

Dec 262014
 

lacx nye

Here is my latest original track: Acitrax. It’s some beefy 90’s inspired techno tinged with acid house influences. 130 BPM riot music. It’s brought to you by the Los Angeles Connection as part of their New Year’s Eve compilation.

Download, blog, DJ this track as much as you want. Feel free share this link if you like what you hear so I don’t have to pay some corporate suits for people to enjoy my art.

Enjoy the free download here:
https://lacx.bandcamp.com/track/acitrax-original-mix

You can hear the rest of the compilation here:
https://lacx.bandcamp.com/album/lacx-nye-vol-1-compilation

Los Angeles Connection on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/LACXofficial

Follow Mercurius FM…
http://Twitter.com/MercuriusFM
http://Facebook.com/MercuriusFM
http://Instagram.com/MercuriusFM

 

Dec 152014
 

Daft Punk Get Lucky Mercurius FM Acid Remix D 800 copy

A classic acid house style remix of Daft Punk’s hit track Get Lucky just in time for the holidays. The track was inspired by dance music pioneer DJ Pierre’s seminal acid house style of music. I also drew inspiration from Daft Punk’s music writing style which integrates beautiful analog synthesizer sounds with the coldness of vintage drum machines. Happy holidays!

FREE DOWNLOAD

Download, blog, DJ this track as much as you want. Feel free share this link if you like what you hear so I don’t have to pay some corporate suits for people to enjoy my art.

Support the track by “hearting” it on HypeMachine!

Also on Youtube & Soundcloud.

Early support from DJ Paul Johnson and Nerdy Frames.

Follow Mercurius FM…
http://Twitter.com/MercuriusFM
http://Facebook.com/MercuriusFM
http://Instagram.com/MercuriusFM

Support the original artist Daft Punk: http://daftpunk.com

Original song and music by Daft Punk. Remix recorded, produced, and mastered by Mercurius FM in Phoenix, Az.

This track is being offered as “fair use” for “non-commercial” purposes. I am not profiting from the remix. I am offering it as a free artistic tribute to my favorite artists.

Nov 132014
 

keep calm and pay to win

On Facebook, the blog Stoney Roads made a post about EDM being mainstream. In the post, they question if it’s really a bad thing. Now, I will admit, I didn’t read the article, but I decided to express my thoughts on the subject in general. Nonetheless, the post got liked by a lot of people. So I figured I’d re-share my thoughts on how EDM going mainstream has been a negative factor to 99% of the scene.

What it comes down to is that mainstream listeners don’t care about the quality or the history of the music they consume. Therefor, the recognition, money, and honors go to the loudest and most heavily advertised artists. The story of acid house is proof of this… guys like DJ Pierre are STILL relatively unknown to the general public. Mainstream listeners don’t care about originators or innovators. They don’t have the time or the interest to. They listen to the music which is easy for them to find and hear. Music which is served through mass multimedia outlets. This doesn’t make them bad people necessarily. It’s just the way it is. The problem is that quality is not the priority to the most powerful people who sell music. Instead the priority for the industry is finding someone who is marketable and focusing on advertising dollars instead of art. This is why “model DJs” and celebrity DJs are on the rise… Because they’re easy to sell. That’s why all this mainstream exposure has been a bad thing. Previously, tracks got discovered by DJs and word of mouth. House music was not dominated by skinny 20-something white guys from the suburbs. There were gay black men, overweight hispanics, white guys, girls, asians, and more. All types of people from any walk of life had a chance. I’m not saying it was a perfect world; there’s always darkness where there is light… but there was at least a chance to be heard. Now, the only way to get heard is to have enough advertising dollars to outspend your competitors.